Saturday, May 22, 2010

Found this very interesting...

I often read this blog and I came across her latest post
http://www.fannygott.com/squids-herding-test

From the blog: "Squid, 19 months old, passed the swedish herding test yesterday! This is the lowest level of herding trials and also something the dog must pass if you want to breed it (and register the dogs with the kennel club)."

I thought this was a great idea! I wish they did this for Border Collies in the United States. I really wish they did...as yes, I am one of "those" people who is an advocate for working dogs, which I mean dogs bred for herding ability. I am not a purist, I don't hate people who have a flyball/agility/obedience bred dog...but personally I like the dogs that are bred for work only.

I prefer dogs that can do agility, then go work sheep well. And in reality, any dog can run agility...but not all dogs can work stock to high levels. Agility is in reality, when you break it down to the basic structure, nothing more than a string of trained behaviors. Herding instinct is not a trained behavior, it cannot be "created" as drive can for agility. It is so complicated and involves so many things. I think it is amazing and I find it sad that some people don't want that in their dogs. To me that is what the Border Collie is all about. I would't want a puppy out of a litter if both parents were not nice working dogs. Just wouldn't make sense.

Of course this testing will never happen, and in reality humans have totally separated their lines (working versus sport). I know where to get a nice working dog from. So that is who I will choose to support.

7 comments:

sclmarm said...

I like the idea of testing on herding before breeding too. I ended up with a Hanging Tree Cowdog through rescue. Mom died when the litter was 3 weeks old and the rancher didn't want to deal with puppies so a rescuer took them in. Anyway, in researching this cross they started a registry for them. If they don't have video or photo proof of the dog hitting heads and heels on cows they won't allow it to be registered. I also heard that they culled anything that didn't show instinct at 3 to 6 months. Kind of hard core, but I like that they have to prove there some drive there.

fulltiltbcs said...

Yeah,that is what I mean, I would like some kind of proof/test :-( But it won't ever happen...

Live Wire Agility said...

I totally agree, although I am not JUST talking about BCs. I know several countries throughout Europe require breeds from the Working/Herding/Sporting classes to first pass a WC (Working Certificate) test before they can persue a breed Championship/used for breeding stock. While I am not a big advocate for the breed ring I do feel by making a WC or equivilant test a REQUIREMENT the instict bred into most breeds remains intact.

Karissa said...

The sad thing about living in "the land of the free" is that people think they have a right to do anything they damn well please. This includes breeding anything with a uterus. Many breed clubs believe that joining the AKC/UKC/CKC, etc. is the beginning of the end for their breed, because these big organizations don't require any specific breed testing for full registration. If a puppy is born to two registered parents, that puppy may also be registered and produce more registered puppies -- even if that dog is the ugliest, dumbest representative of that breed. So sad. There are no standards anymore.

fulltiltbcs said...

Exactly. That is why I only look at a few certain people that breed a litter for THEMSELVES. Out of working parents. And one of the reasons the pups from Zip's litter were all sold on spay/neuter contracts except for one male who went to a stockdog trialing home.

If the person breeding the dog doesn't even keep a pup from the litter, that is a HUGE red flag for me.

Barbara said...

Good post!

Our GSD's father was from Germany and I believe that they have those same requirements there. He was a SchIII dog, and I believe that was a requirement that he get that title in order to breed.

The only thing that worries me, is that if a working title is a requirement, you might see a dumbing down of the test so that more dogs can get it.

I like to see my border collies work livestock, and if I breed Meri it will be to a dog that has worked livestock and shown some talent, and hopefully with relatives that have done really well in USBCHA trials. I know that Meri (or Speck) would likely not be Open level dogs if I can't work herding with them as I would need too, but I would hope that they can do well at Pro-Nov courses

~Barbara

Sarah said...

great post Loretta!!